Virtual Trainings

WSADCP Virtual Training Events 2020

ATTENTION (updated 10-2-2020)The links for the Veteran Treatment Court events are now open for registration!  Those events will occur on November 3, November 17, and December 15, 2020.  Check out the details of each event .  (Details are located near the end of the Registration section below.)

Although the 2020 Annual Conference is cancelled due to COVID-19, WSADCP remains committed to offering training opportunities to promote professional development for the staff of the therapeutic courts in Washington.  To that end WSADCP is providing a series of virtual training events at no cost.  These events will occur between October 5, 2020 and December 15, 2020.

In addition, the Washington Administrative Office of the Courts (AOC) will host a Drug Court Coordinator Training on October 13, 2020.  (Details are located under the Registration section below.)

The trainings are provided at no cost due to the support of these national organizations, WSADCP, and companies willing to sponsor this virtual series.  Please take a moment to visit sponsorship page below.

Hosted By:

Sponsored by: to learn more about each of the sponsors, please click on the logos for the sponsor’s website to find a contact phone number

The virtual trainings are provided at no cost

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Registration is through the training host’s website (CFF, NDCI, and JFV) 

Trainings will not be recorded and will not be available after the scheduled session

Certificates for CJE, CLE, and CEU

Certificates will be provided by email after completing a survey

Win swag or coffee gift card for attending trainings!

Winners will be notified by email after training

Questions?   Please email [email protected]

Text/Call (360) 627-0376

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Drug Court Coordinator Training

October 13, 2020, 8:30 a.m. – Noon

The Administrative Office of the Courts and the Washington State Association of the Drug Court Professionals are providing this half-day training as part of the virtual Annual Drug Court Conference.

Our Partners:  National Drug Court Institute & the Washington State Center for Court Research

Hosted by

Register for Coordinator’s Training:  https://wacourts.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJ0tdOuoqjMrGtLTPYEitjP5c3REev-SliNr

The Virtual Training Series Starts Here!

Register for each event by clicking on the “register here” link.

Please note there are deadlines for registering for each event

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Trainings hosted by Center for Children and Family Futures, Inc.

Family Treatment Court Best Practices (Part 1- Best Practices 1-4)

          Monday, October 5th       11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

          *Recommended for all members of FTC teams to participate

After 25 years of practice experience and scholarly research, Family Treatment Court (FTC) practitioners now have a shared definition of the elements needed to establish and sustain an effective FTC.  The FTC best practices provide guidance to FTC teams as they examine their practice, both through the narrow lens of their own system and their clients and through the expanded lens of the larger multidisciplinary, comprehensive, family-centered system of care that is the FTC. Join these sessions as a team to learn about the FTC best practices and explore how they can be effectively operationalized.  Teams will learn the rationale and provisions of each practice and then spend time in breakout rooms to discuss gaps, strategies, and next steps to implement best practices in your FTC.  Presenters will be available during this action planning time to answer questions, share resources, suggest strategies, and guide teams in planning.

Presenter: Tessa Richter and Alexis Balkey                           

           Register here                          Register deadline:     9/21/20                                 

2.0 Hours of Continuing Education

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Family Treatment Court Best Practices (Part 2- Best Practices 5-8)

          Wednesday, October 7th       11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

          *Recommended for all members of FTC teams to participate

After 25 years of practice experience and scholarly research, Family Treatment Court (FTC) practitioners now have a shared definition of the elements needed to establish and sustain an effective FTC.  The FTC best practices provide guidance to FTC teams as they examine their practice, both through the narrow lens of their own system and their clients and through the expanded lens of the larger multidisciplinary, comprehensive, family-centered system of care that is the FTC. Join these sessions as a team to learn about the FTC best practices and explore how they can be effectively operationalized.  Teams will learn the rationale and provisions of each practice and then spend time in breakout rooms to discuss gaps, strategies, and next steps to implement best practices in your FTC.  Presenters will be available during this action planning time to answer questions, share resources, suggest strategies, and guide teams in planning.

Presenter: Tessa Richter and Alexis Balkey                           

           Register here                          Register deadline:     9/21/20                 

2.0 Hours of Continuing Education

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Embracing a Family Centered Approach in Family Treatment Courts

          Monday, October 12th     11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

          *Recommended for all members of FTC teams to participate

When FTCs first emerged in the mid-1990s, they focused primarily on a parent’s recovery. In the last decade, many FTCs have evolved to meet the individual needs of parents and children. However, services tend to be disconnected from one another and not sufficiently integrated and coordinated. Leaders across the country are striving to advance the capacity of family treatment courts and their partner agencies to provide a comprehensive family-centered approach for children, parents, and families affected by parental substance use disorders in the child welfare system. Established FTCs have utilized cross-systems collaboration and evidence-based practices to strengthen the parent-child relationship and improve parent, child, and family well-being. By treating the family unit, FTC teams can help families break the cycle of substance use, abuse, and neglect, and pave the way to healthy, stable home environments where children can thrive. This presentation will review the importance of focusing on family recovery and then dive into practical strategies to move to a family-centered approach.  During the session, teams will work together in breakout rooms to discuss strategies and next steps to become more family-centered.

Presenter: Tessa Richter, Alexis Balkey, and Jill Gresham     

                   Register here                         Register deadline:     9/28/20                 

2.0 Hours of Continuing Education

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Family Treatment Courts: Peer to Peer Session

          Wednesday, October 28th           11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

          *Recommended for all members of FTC teams to participate

This informal, facilitated conversation will provide FTC professionals the opportunity to connect across counties, discuss relevant issues, address common challenges, and share strategies that have strengthened their FTCs. State leaders are encouraged to attend to hear about the strengths and needs of Washington’s FTCs and families affected by SUD in the child welfare system.  FTC professionals can brainstorm ways to stay connected with their peers after the session concludes.

Presenter: Tessa Richter and Alexis Balkey                      

                   Register here                   Register deadline:     10/14/20                 

No Hours of Continuing Education

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Trainings hosted by National Drug Court Institute

Incentive, Sanctions, and Therapeutic Responses:  The Practical Application of the Science of Behavior Change- Staffing Decisions and Delivery in the Courtrooms (Part 1)

Monday, October 19th     11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

The science of behavior change is complex and knowing how and when to use sanctions, incentives and therapeutic responses effectively can be challenging. What are effective responses to behavior? How should responses to behavior, including incentives and sanctions, be delivered for maximum effect? This series of workshops will review the scientific principles of behavior change and then provide extensive information on the practical application of these principles with physical distance guidelines in place (e.g., during the pandemic) and when in person activities resume. These interactive workshop will:  provide examples of meaningful incentives and sanctions and therapeutic responses,  discuss how to prepare the judge with the information needed to have an effective conversation with participants; share videos of different judges delivering incentives, sanctions and therapeutic responses in the courtroom and review scenarios of typical participant behavior for the audience to decide “What would you do?”

PART 1- focuses on how to engage participants during the Covid-19 pandemic as well as a discussion of team member roles and communication.  We will cover the importance of understanding individual participant risk and needs in determining appropriate response to behavior, and how to provide incentives, sanctions, therapeutic responses, and monitoring while protecting participant and team member safety and well-being during the pandemic.   

Learning Objective:

  • Gain knowledge of key research-based practices for behavior modification.
  • Learn effective delivery of incentive and sanctions in the courtroom.
  • Learn what information is needed to determine what incentives and sanctions are most meaningful for participants and when therapeutic responses are appropriate.

Presenter:  Dr.  Shannon Carey, Helen Harberts and Judge Diane Bull – NDCI Consultants

                             Register here                                      Register deadline:     10/16/20 

2.0 Hours  of Continuing Education

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Incentive, Sanctions and Therapeutic Responses:  The Practical Application of the Science of Behavior Change- Staffing Decisions and Delivery in the Courtroom  (Part 2)

Monday, October 26th     11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

The science of behavior change is complex and knowing how and when to use sanctions, incentives and therapeutic responses effectively can be challenging. What are effective responses to behavior? How should responses to behavior, including incentives and sanctions, be delivered for maximum effect? This series of workshops will review the scientific principles of behavior change and then provide extensive information on the practical application of these principles with physical distance guidelines in place (e.g., during the pandemic) and when in person activities resume. These interactive workshop will:  provide examples of meaningful incentives and sanctions and therapeutic responses,  discuss how to prepare the judge with the information needed to have an effective conversation with participants; share videos of different judges delivering incentives, sanctions and therapeutic responses in the courtroom and review scenarios of typical participant behavior for the audience to decide “What would you do?”

Part 2 – focuses on staffing including a review of effective incentives, sanctions and therapeutic responses and an introduction to a Response Matrix that provides guidelines for selecting appropriate and fair individualized response to behavior. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn effective delivery of incentives and sanctions in the courtroom.
  • Gain knowledge of some key research-based practices for behavior modification.
  • Learn what information is needed to determine what incentives and sanctions are most meaningful for participants and when therapeutic responses are appropriate.

Presenter:  Dr.  Shannon Carey, Helen Harberts and Judge Diane Bull – NDCI Consultants

                             Register here                                      Register deadline:      10/23/20

2.0 Hours  of Continuing Education

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Incentive, Sanctions and Therapeutic Responses:  The Practical Application of the Science of Behavior Change- Staffing Decisions and Delivery in the Courtrooms  (Part 3)

Monday, November 2nd     11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

The science of behavior change is complex and knowing how and when to use sanctions, incentives and therapeutic responses effectively can be challenging. What are effective responses to behavior? How should responses to behavior, including incentives and sanctions, be delivered for maximum effect? This series of workshops will review the scientific principles of behavior change and then provide extensive information on the practical application of these principles with physical distance guidelines in place (e.g., during the pandemic) and when in person activities resume. These interactive workshop will:  provide examples of meaningful incentives and sanctions and therapeutic responses,  discuss how to prepare the judge with the information needed to have an effective conversation with participants; share videos of different judges delivering incentives, sanctions and therapeutic responses in the courtroom and review scenarios of typical participant behavior for the audience to decide “What would you do?”

Part 3 – focuses on court including developing rapport, adjusting to co-occurring disorders and trauma, fairness, capitalizing on hope and the skill steps for effective delivery of incentives, sanctions, and therapeutic responses in the courtroom.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn effective delivery of incentives and sanctions in the courtroom.
  • Gain knowledge of some key research-based practices for behavior modification.
  • Learn what information is needed to determine what incentives and sanctions are most meaningful for participants and when therapeutic responses are appropriate

Presenter:  Dr.  Shannon Carey, Helen Harberts and Judge Diane Bull – NDCI Consultants

                             Register here                                      Register deadline:     10/30/20 

2.0 Hours  of Continuing Education

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Trauma Informed Practices in a Court Setting

Tuesday, November 10th     11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

The GAINS Center has developed training for criminal justice professionals to raise awareness about trauma and its effects.  “How Being Trauma-Informed Improves Criminal Justice System Responses.”

Learning Objectives:

  • Increase understanding and awareness of the impact of trauma
  • Develop trauma-informed responses.
  • Provide strategies for developing and implementing trauma-informed policies.

Presenter:  Julie Seitz – NCDC Project Director

                             Register here                                      Register deadline:    11/6/20  

2.0 Hours  of Continuing Education

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Motivational Interviewing

Monday, November 16th     11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Motivational Interviewing is designed to  help participants see what matters to them and helps them to be engaged, feel valued and develop a vested interest in their long-term recovery planning and case management.   Through motivational interviewing the participant has buy in and voice in identifying goals and a value system that gives them a major role in recovery planning.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn the principles and skills needed to deliver court responses effectively.
  • Gain an in-depth understanding of motivational interviewing as a technique to assist clients in changing their behavior.

Presenter:   Dr. Ken Robinson – NDCI Consultant

                             Register here                                      Register deadline:      11/13/20

2.0 Hours  of Continuing Education

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is WSADCP-WADC-.jpgJuvenile Justice:  Evidence Based and Restorative Justice in Juvenile Drug Treatment Courts

Monday, November 30th     11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

This session introduces participants to the development, operations and current research finding for Juvenile Drug Treatment (JDTCs).  During this two-hour session, participants will explore new research and evidence-based practices and engage in numerous exercises aimed at transferring these finding into operation.  JDTC team members will also learn about emerging research on the concept of adolescent recovery capital and how teams can restructure staffing, court, and case management in order to focus on the development of social, human, cultural/community and financial capital for youth and families.  Participants will learn practical tips for implementation of adolescent recovery capital. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe current research related to best practices in the JDTC model.
  • Discuss and implement JDTC best practices in the local context using varied materials.
  • Define and put into practice adolescent recovery capital elements in order to allow for “natural supports” in the JDTC process.

Presenter:  Dr. Jacqueline van Wormer – Director of Juvenile TTA, NDCI

                       Register here                                      Register deadline:      11/27/20

2.0 Hours  of Continuing Education

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Developing Treatment Plans for Persons with Co-occurring Disorders

Tuesday, December 1st     11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Co-occurring disorders refers to the condition in which an individual has a co-existing mental illness and substance use disorder.   This session will focus on developing and understanding of mental health and substance use disorder’s comorbidity while placing an emphasis on developing effective treatment plans that include evidence based practices and support services.

Learning Objective:  After this session, participant will be able to:

  • Define co-occurring disorders.
  • Describe the clinical and behavioral features of co-occurring disorders.
  • Explain the impact of substance use disorders on other disorders and the interrelated nature of co-occurring disorders.
  • Identify limitation of existing services and eligibility requirements to address co-occurring disorders and the consequences of those limitations.
  • Access relevant resources related to co-occurring disorders.
  • Summarize evidence based best practices for assessing and addressing co-occurring disorders.
  • Differentiate ways to modify and enhance treatment courts to address co-occurring disorders.

Presenter:  Julie Seitz – NCDC Project Director

                             Register here                                      Register deadline:      11/25/20

2.0 Hours  of Continuing Education

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Trainings hosted by Justice For Vets

Military and Veteran Culture / Mentor-Mentee Relationship Fundamentals / Building Your Veteran Community Coalition

                   Tuesday, November 3rd     8:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.

Military and Veteran Culture- Military and Veteran culture can have unique and long-lasting impact on those that serve.  Boot camp, occupational specialty, service branch, deployments, and combat experience all affect service members in may ways that provide a foundation for recovery.   Knowing who you are serving is the first step; to learning how to provide services to them and their families.

     Learner Outcomes-   At the end of this session, the participant will be able to:

    • Describe how serving in the military may have a long-lasting impact and influence on service member, their family, and their interconnectedness to others.
    • Identify how and why veterans learning styles and response to interventions can differ substantially from each other.
    • Identify skills and examine approaches that may more effectively address the needs of justice-involved veterans.

8:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.            Presenter:  Stacy Hester

Mentor-Mentee Relationship Fundamentals- A mentor’s influence can be critical to the veteran mentee’s success while in the Veterans Treatment Court.  This session provides an overview of that role and uses case studies to help depict the ideal relationship-building between mentor and mentee.

    Learner Outcomes-  At the end of this session, the participant will be able to:

    • Identify the eight most fundamental tenets of relationship building.
    • Review case scenarios in which best practices of relationship-building are discussed.
    • Review and practice the critical skills that will enhance the mentor-mentee rapport.

10:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.          Presenter:  Timothy Wynn

Building Your Veterans Community Coalition-  This session provides practical examples and engaging discussion on how to ensure that one of the most critical components to your Veterans Treatment Court- the Mentoring Component- survives and thrives.  The essential role the component provides to the veteran participant concerning continuity of support and resources long after she/he has completed the court program is primary focus of this training.

     Learner Outcomes-  At the end of this session, the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the “Four Pillars of Empowerment”.
    • Promote knowledge on ways in which to develop community partnerships.
    • Provide an overview of Veteran Service Organizations and their potential impact on mentees.
    • Describe principles of practice that sustain the continued growth of your mentor component.

11:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.          Presenter:  Patrick Welch

                             Register here                       Register deadline:  10/27/20

4.0 Hours of Continuing Education

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Multidisciplinary Team:  Consensus, Conflict, or Capitulation / Practical Guide to Incentives, Sanctions, and Therapeutic Interventions / Posttraumatic Stress Disorders

                   Tuesday, November 17th 8:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.

Multidisciplinary Team-  Effective communication among problem-solving court team members is essential for effective decision-making.  The NADCP Adult Drug Court Best Practice Standards Multidisciplinary Team Standards stipulates that all team members contribute relevant insights, observations, and recommendations based on their professional knowledge, training, and experience.   While the judge makes final decisions on matters that affect a participant’s welfare or liberty interests, the Standard clarifies that such decisions are to be made only after the judge considers the perspective of all the team members.   This presentation will outline a set of communication practices that team members can employ to help ensure that their unique perspective is head and valued.  As a bonus, this presentation will discuss when ethical considerations require individual team members to remain silent during team discussions, even when they have relevant information to share. 

     Learner Outcomes-  At the end of this session, the participant will be able to:

    • Identify the unique roles of each member of the Veterans Treatment Court Team.
    • Describe how working as part of a multi-disciplinary team enhances participant outcomes.
    • Apply the Adult Drug Court Best Practice Standards for multi-disciplinary teams.

8:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.           Presenter:  Mary Jane Knisely

Practical Guide to Incentives, Sanctions, and Therapeutic Interventions-  This presentation outlines the basic behavior modification principles and their applicability in incentives, both formal and informal, and their application in the program.  The presentation recognizes the effect of immediate consequences in modifying client behavior and identifies the distinction between court-imposed sanctions and incentives, and treatment responses.  The presentation discusses the importance of formulating a strategy for the application of graduated sanctions and incentives and appropriate treatment responses, along with the importance of the consistency in those responses. 

     Learner Outcomes-  At the end of this session, the participant will be able to:

    • Justify how incentives and sanctions motivate participants to comply with program requirements.
    • Examine various incentives and sanctions that can be used to respond to the client’s conduct.
    • Recognize that incentives and sanctions must be consistently and uniformly imposed.

10:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.               Presenter:  Jeffrey Manske

 Posttraumatic Stress Disorders-  This session will first provide an overview of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), including diagnostic features, the identification of biomarkers for PTSD, and interventions for PTSD.  The second portion of this presentation will focus on how trauma and PTSD may impact the family and interventions to prevent family conflict, and domestic violence are discussed.

     Learner Outcomes-  At the end of this session, the participant will be able to:

    • Describe common signs/reported symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder.
    • Identify various types of trauma.
    • Describer the available evidence-based interventions for PTSD.
    • Develop ways to respond to behaviors and symptoms without retraumatizing the participant.
    • Recognize how PTSD may impact family unit.

11:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.          Presenter:  Christa Marshal

                             Register here                  Register deadline:  11/10/20

4.0 Hours of Continuing Education

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Military Justice 101 /  Mental Health Disorders and the Justice-Involved Veteran Population / Military Sexual Trauma

                   Tuesday, December 15th 8:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.

Military Justice 101- This session provides context and comparison to the civilian criminal justice system and the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ).  Specifically, the presenter will discuss the application of the UCMJ, the implications of living under the UCMJ, and how VTCs can liaison appropriately with military units for active duty personal who are participants.

     Learner Outcomes- At this session, the participant will be able to:

    • Examine how the UCMJ and civilian criminal justice system are similar and where the UCMJ is unique in purpose and function.
    • Identify the multiple types of military discharges and how they may be determined.
    • Identify and connect the appropriate military personnel when dealing with an active-duty participant.

8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.            Presenter:  Clyde J. (Butch) Tate II

Mental Health Disorders and the Justice-Involved Veteran Population-  This session provides an overview of common mental health disorders, as identified in the DSM-5, that participants may be experiencing.  Attendees will learn about screening and assessment interventions used to assist with identifying these potential disorders.  Additionally, this session will introduce participants to how help facilitate change through available evidence-based treatment modalities.

     Learner Outcomes-  At the end of this session, the participant will be able to:

    • Recognize how mental illness can impact the individual and those around her/him.
    • Recognize various disorders that can be present for this population.
    • Identify current clinical interventions for the identified population.

10:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.          Presenters:  Brian Meyer

Military Sexual Trauma- This session gives an overview of military sexual trauma (MST).  MST encompasses experiences of sexual harassment and sexual assault during military service and often is associated with a variety of mental health conditions to include posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

     Learner Outcomes-  At the end of this session, the participant will be able to:

    • Define Military Sexual Trauma (MST).
    • Describe the adverse impact of MST on the individual.
    • Identify services that are available to the individual in the VA Healthcare System and within the community.

11:30 a.m. – 12:45 a.m.           Presenters:  Meghan Geiss

                             Register here                  Register deadline:  12/8/20

4.0 Hours of Continuing Education

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Presenter Biographies

Tessa Richter, LCSW, MSW- Tess Richter currently services as a Senior Program Associate for the National Family Drug Court Training and Technical Assistance Program for Center for Children and Family Futures (CCFF).  In this role, she provides technical assistance and support for several substance abuse and child welfare related projects.  Additionally, Ms. Richter supports and oversees state-level efforts to improve outcomes for families affected by substance use disorders in the child welfare system.  Prior to her position with CCFF, Ms. Richter was the Problem Solving Court Coordinator and Juveniles Program Coordinator for the 1st Judicial District in Colorado, where she coordinated the family treatment court program in Jefferson County, Colorado.  She also has experience as a child welfare caseworker.   She completed the Women’s Addiction Services Leadership Institute (WASLI) through the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) in 2015.   Ms. Richter received her MSW from the University of Denver with an emphasis in Child Welfare and holds a Bachelor of Science in Human Development and Family Studies from the University of Missouri.   She is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker.  

Alexis Balkey- Ms. Balkey is a Senior Manager at Children and Family Futures, Inc. (CFF) and works with the National Family Drug Court (FDC) Training and Technical Assistance (TTA) Program.   Ms. Balkey provides mentoring and direct supervision to Program Associates and Program Specialists that are part of the FDC TTA Program.   She assists with the project management and reporting tasks to compile and synthesize information on lessons, results and policy and practice innovations.   Additionally, she provides TTA to FDCs across the nation responding to over 1200 requests in approximately nine years.  Ms. Balkey is Change Leader for the statewide system improvement initiative enhancing systems collaboration to improve outcomes for families within the child welfare system affected by substance use disorders.   Additionally, Ms. Balkey is Change Leader for the Prevention and Family Recovery (PFR) initiative funded by the Duke Foundation Charitable Trust assisting jurisdictions to advance the capacity of their FDCs to provide more comprehensive family-centered care to children, parents and families affected by substance use disorders through integration and institutionalization of proven parenting services and developmental therapeutic services for children.  Previous to her employment with CFF, Ms. Balkey was the Program Manager for Riverside County Family Preservation Court, located in Indio, CA where she successfully managed a Family Drug Court with multiple funding streams including the SAMHSA Children Affected by Methamphetamine (CAM) Federal grant.  Ms. Balkey is a certified addictive disorder counselor by the Breining Institute, College for Advance Study of Addictive Disorders with robust knowledge of alcohol and other drug treatment programs.  Ms. Balkey received a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice from Temple University and a Master of Public Administration from the California Stage University, San Bernardino.

Jill Gresham- Jill Gresham serves as a Senior Program Associate with the National Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare at Children and Family Futures.  In this role, she serves as an advisor and technical consultant to states, counties, tribes, and regions across the county in issues related to substance abuse, child welfare, and the courts, providing and coordinating various levels of technical assistance.   Jill primarily serves the In-Depth Technical Assistance program and provides support to states working to address infants with prenatal exposure from pregnancy through infancy.  Jill has 15 years of experience in the substance abuse field, the majority of which was working with women and mothers.  Familiar with the spectrum of substance abuse services and trauma, Ms. Gresham is experienced in providing substances use treatment services in various services setting from harm reduction housing to long term residential programs for pregnant and parenting women.   Jill is a certified drug and alcohol counselor and experienced supervisor.  In her roles as clinician and director, she worked closely with Child Protective Services sitting on Child Protective Teams and an advisory board to King County’s Family Treatment Court.  Prior to joining Children and Family Futures, Jill co-founded and directed New Traditions, an outpatient treatment facility for low income, pregnant and parenting women in Seattle, Washington.   Ms. Gresham earned a BA from the University of Massachusetts and an MA in Counseling Psychology from Antioch University Seattle.

Dr. Shannon Carey-  co-president and senior research associate at NPC Research, has worked in the areas of criminal justice and substance use treatment for 20 years, particularly in the area of drug courts and cost analyses.   Altogether, she has been involved in performing process, outcome, and/or cost evaluations in over 300 adult, juvenile, family, reentry, DWI and veterans drug courts across the U.S., including federal drug and reentry courts in Oregon and Virginia.  Dr. Carey also provides consulting and training in treatment courts operating in Australia, Chile, New Zealand, and England.   She was involved with developing and writing the NADCP Adult Drug Court Best Practices Standards and has assisted several states in writing their stat-specific standards for all types of treatment courts.   She also assists in developing treatment court certification processes as well as peer review process that has been launched in several states, in which treatment court teams visit and give feedback and support each other on implementing research-based best practices.

Helen Harberts, M.A., J.D. – has been working in criminal justice since 1983.  As a prosecutor, Ms. Harberts rose to become the chief deputy district attorney in Butte County, California.  As a chief probation officer (1995 to 2002), she implemented multiple problem-solving courts.  After the stint in probation, she returned to her roots as a prosecuting attorney, practicing law exclusively in problem-solving courts for over five years.    She retired in 2011, but popped out of retirement for five months in 2012 to 2013 to serve as the interim director of the Harris County Community Supervision and Corrections Department in Houston.   She published a Client Life Skills Workbook for the Hazelden Community Corrections Program, as well as writing chapters in Drug Courts, published by Springer Publications (2007), and NDCI’s The Drug Court Judicial Benchbook.  Ms. Harberts continues to train probation and justice professionals across the United States.  She was California’s Chief Probation Officer of the Year in 2000, and was honored as the 2009 Prosecutor of the Year by Region 8 of California Narcotics Officer Association.  In 2013, Ms. Harberts was inducted into the Stanley Goldstein Drug Court Hall of Fame.  It was the achievements of a professional lifetime.

Judge Diane Bull- has served since 1995 as the presiding judge of County Criminal Court #11 in Harris County, Texas.  A cofounder of the program, she has presided over one of five SOBER (Saving Ourselves by Education and Recovery) DWI court dockets in Houston since 2008.  She’s a third-generation honors graduate of Texas A&M University, and received her J.D. from Baylor Law School.  Prior to being elected, Judge Bull spent five years as an assistant district attorney.  Thereafter, she represented two law enforcement organizations as their in-house counsel, and had a general civil and criminal practice.  Her husband is a retired 30-year veteran police officer.  Judge Bull has received numerous awards, including the 2018 Kevin Quinlan Traffic Safety Award, as well as recognition for her work in treatment courts.   She’s served on many committees for the Harris County Criminal Courts at the Law, the Texas Center for Judiciary, and the Houston Bar Association.  She was presiding judge of the 15 Harris County misdemeanor courts, chair of the Harris County Specialty Courts Committee, and past chair of the DWI Curriculum Committee for the Texas Center for the Judiciary.  Judge Bull us a frequent speaker on topics related to DWI, treatment courts, and traffic safety.

Dr. Kenneth Robinson- received his doctor of education degree in educational psychology and counseling and his M.S. degree in psychology from the University of Memphis.  He is the president of Correctional Counseling, Inc. and is he co-developer of Moral Reconation Therapy (MRT), which is listed on the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs.   He was the director of clinical services and crisis stabilization from the Midtown Mental Health Center in Memphis, Tennessee.  He worked in mental health services for the Shelby County Correction Center and the Project CERCE at the State Regional Prison in Memphis.  Dr. Robinson conducts frequent trainings and workshops in MRT throughout the United States, Australia, New Zealand, Scotland, and Puerto Rico.  He has published and presented numerous professional articles in the areas of psychopharmacology and mental health.  He is co-author of all the MRT treatment materials and other books.  Dr. Robinson received the Presidential Citation from the American Psychological Association in 2009 for Innovative Practices Strategies to Address Social and Behavioral Problems of At-Risk Youth.  He is on the faculty of the National Judicial College, NDCI, and National DWI Treatment Staffing Training for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Julie Seitz, LGSW, LADC- is a project director with the National Center for DWI Courts (NCDC), a division of NADCP.  She joined NDCD in 2018, bringing with her 20 years of experience working in the clinical sector.  Previously, she was the clinical director of the Center for Alcohol and Drug Treatment in Duluth, Minnesota.  Additionally, she spent 10 years as a treatment provider for the Minnesota Sixth Judicial District DWI and mental health courts.   She has spent the last 20 years of her career giving clients a voice.  IN her work with clients, she has focused on her clinical practice on feedback-informed research and outcome-driven practice.  Ms. Seitz has trained at the local, national, and international levels on feedback-informed treatment, drug court best practices, and the science of addiction. 

Stacy Hester, USMCV, Owner/President 3C-Concepts, LLC –  Stacy Hester is a Marine Corps veteran who served eight  honorable, active-duty years as an intelligence analysts and reconnaissance marine.  Having faced the cultural challenges of transition in the battle from home, he set his sights on continuing the purpose of serving after service by fighting for his fellow vets on the other side of active duty.  This led to the formation of his service-disabled veteran-owned small business, 3C-Concepts- Speaking, Training, Program Development- where, among other projects, he developed a program transition concept called Veteran Rally Point, announced in 2019 by the Department of Defenses as a best practice model.  He is deeply privileged to have served many years as a faculty member and consultant with Justice for Vets in training veterans treatment court, and he continues that relationship today.  He is co-founder of Eagles OPS, a veterans’ foundation where he serves as director of development and organizational management in the foundation’s mission of “connecting relationships and resources to bring our heroes home, one operation at a time.”  He believes that when, together, we put passion to purpose, we will succeed in bringing heroes home.  Mr. Hester has a B.A. in English language and literature. 

Patrick Welch, Ph.D., Senior Veteran Mentor- Buffalo Veterans Treatment Court Mentor Program-B-  Dr. Patrick Welch started his military career at 17 when he enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps.  He served in Vietnam where he was severely wounded in action and was hospitalized for two years while recovering.  He was an international hospitality industry executive for 48 years, has worked in over 50 countries, and has been a chief financial officer, chief operating officer, chief executive officer, and owner of several businesses.  In December 2007, Dr. Welch and his partners sold their business and retired.  In January 2008, Dr. Welch received a call from the Erie County executive asking him to serve as director of veterans services for Erie county, New York, and the 100,000 veterans who live there.  At the same time he was offered a position as an adjunct professor at Daemen College in Amherst, New York.  He also became involved in the Buffalo veteran treatment court as a veteran mentor  In 2010, he founded the Center for Veterans and Veteran Family Services at Daemen College.  He spends considerable time with veterans involved with the Buffalo veterans treatment court and Justice for Veterans.  He also serves as director of military programs for Higher Ground New York.

Timothy Wynn, Veterans Certified Forensic Peer Specialist/Coordinator, Philadelphia Veterans Treatment Court-  Timothy Wynn is a U.S. Marine Corps veteran who served from 1999 to 2003.  During his enlistment he was stationed at Camp Lejeune.  He also served in Iraq during the initial invasion in 2003 with the Second Military Police Battalion.  He was honorably discharged as a sergeant.  Mr. Wynn is currently a veterans certified forensic peer specialist in the City of Philadelphia.  He is the coordinator of the Philadelphia Veterans Court Mentor Program, which provides peer-to-peer support to veterans involved in the criminal justice system.  He is also a certified Trauma Recovery Empowerment Model facilitator.  He holds groups twice a week inside Curran Fromhold Correctional Facility in Philadelphia, working with veterans who are incarcerated to help them manage the emotions from the trauma they have been exposed to and to divert them from returning to prison upon their release.  He is also an instructor on the crisis intervention team for the City of Philadelphia, training Philadelphia police officers on military culture, PTSD, and traumatic brain injury and help them find ways to get veterans into treatment instead of putting them in prison.

 

Mary Jane Knisely- District Court Judge, Felony Impaired Driving Court, STEER & Veterans Treatment Court, CAMO- Judge Mary Jane Knisley, a native Montanan, graduated from Texas Christian University with a B.S. in psychology.  Receiving her J.D. from the University of Montana School of Law, she clerked for the district court before becoming a Billings deputy city prosecutor.  In 1997, Judge Knisely was elected as Billings municipal court judge, and in 2010 she was elected to the General Jurisdiction District Court bench, becoming the presiding chief judge in 2014.  Judge Knisley pioneered drug, DUI, veterans, and mental health courts in Montana.  She currently presides over STEER (Sobriety, Treatment, Education, Excellence, and Rehabilitation), a felony impaired driving court, and CAMO (Courts Assisting Military Offenders), a veterans treatment court  In May 2017, STEER and CAMO were selected as NADCP Academy/Mentor Courts.  Judge Knisley is the Region 10 judicial outreach liaison, in partnership with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the American Bar Association Judicial Division  She serves on the faculty of the National Judicial College, NADCP, NCDC, NDCI, and Justice for Vets.  Appointed to the Montana Governor’s Juvenile Justice Advisory Council, Judge Knisley has a mission to reduce the number of juveniles detained, diverting them to community-based programs.  She recently received the State Bar of Montana’s Karla M. Gray Equal Justice Award.

Jeffrey Manske, United States Magistrate Judge, Western District of Texas, Waco Division-  Judge Jeffrey C. Manske currently serves as the U.S. magistrate judge for the Western District of Texas, Waco division.  He received his appointment in 2001 and was reappointed to a third eight-year term in 2017.  In addition to his duties supporting the U.S. District Court, Judge Manske presides over the magistrate court at Fort Hood, Texas, where he has worked closely with U.S. Army leadership, active-duty soldiers, and veterans for 16 years.  His responsibilities while presiding over magistrate court include pretrial felony maters and misdemeanor offenses committed by civilians on Fort Hood, as well as presiding over misdemeanor DWI offenses involving active-duty soldiers.  In 2015, Judge Manske was instrumental in the creation of the Fort Hood VETS Court, the first federal veterans treatment court operating on a U.S. military base.   The Fort Hood VETS Court operates bimonthly in a round-table setting, with each veteran participant receiving one-on-one veteran mentor support.  The Fort Hood VETS Court team shared its treatment court model at the 2017 NADCP conference.

Christa Marshall, Psy. D., Licensed Clinical Psychologist, Marshall Psychological Services, LLC- Dr. Christa Marshall completed her doctoral training at Roosevelt University in Chicago.  Her dissertation examined differential diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Iraq and Afghanistan veterans.  She completed her post-doctoral training in medical rehabilitation psychology at Hines VA Hospital, specializing in spinal cord injury, polytrauma rehabilitation, neuropsychology, and blind rehabilitation.  For three years, she worked for the Veterans Health Administration, delivering general mental health services via telehealth to a rural clinic in Emporia, Virginia.  During this period, she also worked in the Polytrauma Rehabilitation Center, an acute inpatient rehabilitation unit, assessing and treating veterans recovery from a variety of physical, psychological, and cognitive issues, including traumatic amputations, stroke, and TBI.  She served as a national VA consultant for prolonged exposure, an evidence-based psychotherapy used to treat PTSD.  She is currently in private practice in Richmond, Virginia, specializing in assessment and treatment of neurocognitive and emotional conditions.  She also enjoys working with families adjusting to parenthood, mood and anxiety disorders, and trauma.  She has taught undergraduate and graduate psychology students in the classroom and online, and ahs supervised graduate-level trainees working toward a doctoral degree.

Meghan Geiss, Ph.D., LCP, Neuropsychologist, Hunter Holmes McGuire VA Medical Center- Meghan Geiss is a neuropsychologist at the Polytrauma Rehabilitation Center, an acute rehabilitation inpatient unit for veterans and active-duty service members presenting with acquired traumatic brain injury (TBI) and other neurological illnesses at the Hunter Holmes McGuire VA Medical Center in Richmond, Virginia.  She received a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling at the University of Albany, State University of New York, and earned her Ph.D. in counseling psychology at the University of Memphis.  She completed her clinical internship at the Malcolm Randall VA Medical Center in Gainesville, Florida, where she worked with veterans in polytrauma settings.  She has concentrated her clinical and research efforts on acute and post-acute rehabilitation issues among U.S. veterans with a history of TBI, including sleep behaviors.  Ms. Geiss is a member of the American Psychological Association Divisions 40 (Society of Clinical Neuropsychology) and 22 (Society of Rehabilitation Psychology), the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine, and the National Academy of Neuropsychology.

 

Brian Meyer, Ph.D., LCP, Clinical Psychologist, H.H. McGuire Veteran Administration  Medical Center- Brian L. Meyer, Ph.D., LCP, is a clinical psychologist and the post-traumatic stress disorder/substance use disorders specialist at the Central Virginia VA Health System.  He is also an assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and an affiliate assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at Virginia Commonwealth University.  He obtained his A.B. from Harvard University and his Ph.D. in clinical psychology with a specialization in adolescents and families from Duke University.  Dr. Meyer has worked in the child welfare and child and adult mental health fields as a clinician, administrator, teacher, policy maker, program developer, expert witness, researcher, and trainer.  In his current roles, Dr. Meyer provides evidence-based treatment for veterans who have problems with PTSD, substance use, depression, TBI, and other co-occurring conditions; works with veterans and their families to address post-combat adaptations; train psychology trainees; and develops and conducts research on treatments for PTSD, substance abuse, and co-morbid conditions.  He is also in demand nationally as a speaker on a wide range of content areas, including the treatment of trauma and co-morbid condition, substance abuse, complex trauma, the effects of trauma and substance abuse on families, veterans’ mental health, mindfulness meditation, secondary traumatization and self-care, and collaborative courts.  Dr. Meyer is the co-author of Transcending Self Therapy; Group Integrative Cognitive Behavioral Treatment Book for Facilitators (2019), a treatment manual for people with substance use disorders. 

Clyde J. (Butch) Tate II, J.D., US Army (Retired), Chief Counsel, National Association of Drug Court Professionals- Clyde J. “Butch” Tate retired as a major general from the U.S. Army Judge Advocate General’s Corps in 2014.  He last served as the deputy judge advocate general, one of the top two military attorneys in the Army.  He is now a consultant and advocate for national, state, and local initiatives addressing the legal needs of military personnel, veterans, and families.  He is also chief counsel of NADCP and senior advisor to Strategic Organization a Kansas City firm supporting Army OneSource, which delivers services and support to soldiers and families.  General Tate’s Army career included service as liaison to Congress, ethics official, nearly a decade as legal advisor to special operations and airborne units, senior legal advisor for Multinational Corps in Iraq, commandant of the army judge advocate general’s legal center and school, and chief judge of the Army’s Court of Criminal Appeals.  He is the current co-chair of the ABA Coordinating Committee on Veterans Benefit Services and the special advisor for military and veteran affairs to the president of the ABA.  In recognition of his proven commitment to diversity and inclusion, in 2013 General Tate was awarded the prestigious Hispanic National Bar Association’s Presidential Award for leadership, advocacy, and service.